Take back the narrative

Oppressive people exert control by describing us on their terms and telling us who we are. Controlling the narrative means controlling the power.

JOIN US AS WE TAKE BACK OUR POWER BY TELLING OUR OWN STORIES AND EXPRESSING WHO WE ARE ON OUR OWN TERMS.

Photo Credit: The Gender Spectrum Collection

What It Means to Take Back the Narrative

All across the country, the narrative of trans* lives has been under the control of transphobic conservatives and religious extremists. The stories told by these parties have consistently attacked trans* communities, painting us as something to be feared, to be regarded as harmful and negative. These folks create a narrative that says trans identities are dangerous and should be erased or cast out, and it’s time for our communities to learn how to use our voice to change that.

It’s your story, not theirs.

 

If you would like to join us by sharing your story, we’d like to help amplify it. This isn’t just Trans Empowerment Project’s story to tell, the authentic experiences of our trans siblings should be told by you. Use the link below to join our storyteller list and we will make sure you have the tools you need to make your story heard!

Storytelling is one of the most powerful tools in our arsenal, and it has been neglected for too long by our folks.

If you would like to join us by sharing your story, we’d like to help amplify it. This isn’t just Trans Empowerment Project’s story to tell, the authentic experiences of our trans siblings should be told by you!

Use the link above to join our storyteller list and we will make sure you have the tools you need to make your story heard.

Help us thrive! Help us all to Take Back the Narrative!

Why does storytelling matter?

As it stands now, our history has been hidden away from the public. Cultures that used to celebrate gender-nonconformity were gaslit into erasing their gender-diverse past. Our trans* ancestors were misgendered and stripped of their identity (and even today how many times have newscasters not respected trans* individuals’ pronouns? How many obituaries have listed one’s gender at birth instead of their gender identity). The Stonewall Riots, the birth of queer pride, is completely absent from public education despite its significance to both the trans* and queer communities and the impact it had on how society interacts with those communities today. 

In addition to this, what little representation we do receive is often not kind to us, nor is it accurate to our experiences. Think on this: How many instances have movies or T.V. shows shown trans* people to be overly sexual? How many times have trans* people been the villains in our video games? How many trans* in books have lived long enough to have a happily ever after? And also think on this: In how many of those instances were those narratives written by trans* folk? These stories from cishet perspectives have consistently attacked the trans* community, encouraging transphobic rhetoric. 

By us telling our own stories, we can create a space that nurtures understanding instead of inspiring fear. We can make representation that is accurate to who we are!